Feds: leaking is worse than spying

Posted: January 24, 2011 in Uncategorized

All,

Obama has once again exposed himself as the lying, hypocritical neoconservative he really is, rather than the moderate progressive he portrayed himself as during his campaign.  And this is just more evidence of that.

If leaking is worse than spying, and the secrecy laws actually exist to protect governments from embarrassment, what can be said for accountability and the rule of law?  Could not government avoid embarrassment entirely by the simple expedient of making EVERYTHING it does a state secret?  What would prevent them from doing so?

Clearly, if the law has been broken, and a classified document is exposed in the process that does not endanger the national security, is not a greater good served served?

Indeed, I am a subscriber to Julian Assange’s asserted philosophy that the only thing that a government has a right to keep a secret from the governed are matters that directly represent a clear and present danger to the legitimate security needs of proper government functionings if exposed.  Anything else is and should be fair game – governments DO NOT have a right to keep anything secret simply to avoid embarrassment to themselves.

Scott

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Feds: leaking is worse than spying

http://www.politico.com/blogs/joshgerstein/0111/Feds_leaking_is_worse_than_spying.html?showall

Leaking classified information to the media is a more serious offense than spying, the Justice Department argued in a court filing last week.

The argument came in a motion supporting the detention of Jeffrey Sterling, a former CIA officer indicted for allegedly giving a reporter classified details about a CIA program aimed at interfering with Iran’s nuclear efforts.

“The defendant’s unauthorized disclosures…may be viewed as more pernicious than the typical espionage case where a spy sells classified information for money,” the prosecution team wrote in a brief submitted by attorneys at Justice Department headquarters and the U.S. Attorney’s office in Alexandria, Va.

“Unlike the typical espionage case where a single foreign country or intelligence agency may be the beneficiary of the unauthorized disclosure of classified information, this defendant elected to disclose the classified information publicly through the mass media. Thus, every foreign adversary stood to benefit from the defendant’s unauthorized disclosure of classified information, thus posing an even greater threat to society,” the brief said.

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